CARILLION RAIL – KETTERING ATWS

BACKGROUND – AN OVERVIEW OF THE CURRENT SITUATION

In May 2015 RSS were asked by Carillion Rail working near Kettering Station in Northamptonshire to provide adjacent Open Line ALO Safe System of Work using ATWS. This area consists of 4 lines known as the Down fast, Up fast, Down slow and Up slow. They were having issues with carrying out the renewal of the Up Fast between St. Pancras Station and Tapton Junction.

The Down slow being the ALO, could only be taken under possession during the night and had to be open to trains by 0800. Line Blocks were considered, but not appropriate as they would have caused problems for the train operators. This led to a short window of opportunity to complete the work with machines working ALO.

SOLUTION – HOW WE IMPROVED SAFE TRACK ACCESS

At first we were asked to use ATWS with Special Application (detonator protection) on the Down slow where some sections are Bi-Directional. Special Application of ATWS means detonators are used along-side the ATWS so if a train has to be stopped on the approach to the warning zone / dig area, detonators would explode causing the train to stop safely.

However, signal LR62 on the Up slow would have caused complications during the operation of the ATWS in Special Apps mode as a Signallers Instructions would need to be in place. After discussions with Carillion and the Signaller the plan was to drop the Special Application aspect and to use ATWS for machine warning with EWK warning devices mounted on the OTP.

A Signallers instruction would need to in place to prevent trains setting back once initiating the warning.

KETTERING

KETTERING

CONCLUSIONS / RESULTS – WHAT BENEFIT WAS THIS FOR THE CLIENT

The ATWS was successfully used and the renewal of the Up Fast was completed on time and without incident. This Safe System of Work proved to be successful without the need for Line Blockages being taken allowing the OTP to work more effectively with minimum stand down time. Carillion Rail have used ATWS on regular occasions in the past for ALO working and have always found the system to be safe, reliable and beneficial to ALO working reducing the need for line blocks.

Without the ATWS in use the 400 yard renewal would have been reduced to a mere 200 yards, so conclusion is a 50% increase in productivity.

ALSTOM TRACK WARNING CASE STUDY

BACKGROUND – AN OVERVIEW OF THE CURRENT SITUATION

Rail Safety Solutions (RSS) Limited, a subsidiary of Auctus Management Group Limited, were tasked by Network Rail (NWR) and Alstom, one of the world’s leading providers of integrated railway systems, to increase workforce safety for those operatives working on the £197 million Bristol Area Signalling Renewal and Enhancement (BASRE) project.

The BASRE project is part of a planned 61 month initiative to provide an immunised and re-gauged signalling system. The requirement for the renewal stems from the need to provide an Alternating Current (AC)-immune and electrification gauge-compliant Signalling system, ahead of the pioneering development that will see the first electric passenger train running to Bristol.

SOLUTION – HOW WE IMPROVED SAFE TRACK ACCESS

At the time, access was hindered by the location of the Signalling renewals that hampered the ability for the deployment of traditional warning systems such as Lookout or Line Blocks, thus increasing the risk of an accident/incident as well as reducing efficiency / productivity. The RSS TWS planning team were tasked with producing a resolution to the problem facing NWR personnel and ultimately provide a solution that creates a safe working zone from which to operate.

RSS’s in-house planning team began by conducting a preliminary radio graphic examination of the area which covered 97 miles (1672 yards) to 96 miles (1430 yards) up and down the Badminton Line. By taking the time and resources to conduct this initial inspection, RSS were able to offer a more bespoke solution to NWR and Alstom. Working in conjunction with the client, the most effective method of workforce protection was determined to be the Automatic Track Warning System (ATWS).

The ATWS provides advanced audible/visual warning when a train passes over the ‘Strike-In’ treadle. The warning remains on until automatically deactivated by the same train passing over the ‘Strike Out’ Treadle and cancels the warning. This innovative design made it ideal for a static work-site where Patrolling Maintenance personnel required unfettered access to the Alderton Tunnel during the renewal of the Train Operated Warning System (TOWS).

Alstom Track Warning

Alstom Track Warning

CONCLUSIONS / RESULTS – WHAT BENEFIT WAS THIS FOR THE CLIENT

Traditionally, SSOWS planners have opted for Line Blocks/Unassisted Lookouts as they appear, on the face of it, to provide a cost-effective solution to safety. By focusing on these methods of protection, companies are experiencing an increase in incidents relating to fatigue, lapses in concentration and human error, which in turn has led to a high proportion of productivity being lost and resulted in an increased level of cost, whilst impacting heavily on track worker safety. By deploying the ATWS system Alstom and NWR were able to increase workforce efficiency/productivity by reducing the level of disruption for Patrolling Maintenance Personnel whilst delivering enhanced protection methods for their workforce. The system is set to be deployed for an initial 6 month period starting in February 2017.

SIEMENS RAIL AUTOMATION CASE STUDY

BACKGROUND – AN OVERVIEW OF THE CURRENT SITUATION

In March 2015 RSS were approached by SRA working on the North Lincolnshire Re-signalling Scheme. The project limits are from Scunthorpe Foreign Ore Junction, through Wrawby Junction to Barton Upon Humber, Immingham and Cleethorpes. Due to the amount of freight traffic travelling through the area, access was limited to standard rules of the route access of Saturday nights only. Siemens requested the support of RSS to assist in increasing the track access available to their signalling engineers, but without disrupting any strategic freight services in this key transport corridor.
Initially, Siemens requested RSS to provide either a fully Automatic Track Warning System (ATWS) or a Lookout Operated Warning System (LOWS) which would allow their teams track access for testing purposes of level crossings, AWS and other various signal testing procedures. Their current SSOW being employed was by way of line blockages which meant long stand down times between trains of up to 30 minutes. As the majority of work was undertaken during daytime hours this presented genuine challenges in terms of productivity.

SOLUTION – HOW WE IMPROVED SAFE TRACK ACCESS

Following several meetings with the client it was decided to use a LOWS option due to the flexibility of the system allowing sites to be moved around in a more cost effective way to the client. This system would also be used at night, again negating the need for line blockages and the associated paperwork and time constraints.

The next step was for RSS to map the whole project finding the best locations for the LOWS Lookouts and central processing units to ensure signal strength and continuity of the system. Additionally RSS monitored train movements through Barnetby Station which gave an indication of the stand down time.

With this information we generated 35 LOWS plans that were issued to the LOWS teams and the client to assist their own teams on site, SSOW planners and provided the exact location needed by SRA. The client would then be able to arrange for the LOWS teams to be in the right place just by informing us of the LOWS site plan number they wished to use at the planning stage.








EXAMPLE OF LOWS PLAN KILLINGHOLME TO BROCKLESBY

FIG. 2 - LOWS WORKER OPERATING A HANDSET
FIG 1: EXAMPLE OF LOWS PLAN KILLINGHOLME TO BROCKLESBY FIG. 2 – LOWS WORKER OPERATING A HANDSET

CONCLUSIONS / RESULTS – WHAT BENEFIT WAS THIS FOR THE CLIENT

We have now been working with Siemens since 20/07/2015 covering Monday to Friday day shifts and Sunday to Thursday night shifts. The equipment provided by RSS has proved to be very reliable in this area and has allowed access without the need for line blockages – resulting in a significant increase in productivity for the signalling teams.

Feedback from the client is that SRA feel confident in the equipment and that the LOWS teams are very professional whilst carrying out their duties. The flexibility of the LOWS system has increased access to the track, therefore increasing productivity in a very cost effective manner.

AMEY CEFA – ROYAL ALBERT BRIDGE

BACKGROUND – AN OVERVIEW OF THE CURRENT SITUATION

Rail Safety Solutions Limited (RSS), a subsidiary of Auctus Management Group Limited, was tasked with providing a safe working environment for Amey – Civils Examination Framework Agreement (CEFA) whilst their personnel examined the structure of the Royal Albert Bridge based in the town of Saltash, Plymouth.

The bridge was designed and engineered by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, who devised a series of pioneering methods during the construction of this iconic structure which led to him becoming one of the most well-known design engineers that this country has ever produced.
The bridge was refurbished in 2010 however, as with any long-standing structure, it is important to ensure that it remains safe to use. AMEY CEFA, who have been named as Network Rail’s sole supplier on the Civil Examinations Framework Agreement, have been commissioned as part of a multi-million-pound project to carry out a full rope access inspection of the structural supports.

SOLUTION

As part of this examination, RSS were tasked with providing a solution that would ultimately allow the AMEY CEFA workforce to operate without the need for a Line Block or Lookouts, which would have brought about a large amount of disruption as well as potentially increasing project lead times resulting in significant rises in the levels of resources required to complete the inspection.

Senior Planners at RSS were tasked with surveying the site on the 24th February 2017 where it was highlighted that the most appropriate method of protection for the AMEY CEFA workforce would be the Automatic Track Warning System (ATWS). The train movements across the bridge required a system that would be able to provide a bi-directional warning from a static location on-site as well as reduce levels of worker fatigue.

amey cefa royal albert bridge

amey cefa royal albert bridge

CONCLUSIONS / RESULTS – WHAT BENEFIT WAS THIS FOR THE CLIENT

The ATWS is well suited to meet the requirements of this sort of scenario due to the systems innovative design which provides both an audible and visual warning whenever the train passes over the ‘Strike-in’ Treadle. The warning remains on until automatically deactivated by the same train passing over the ‘Strike-out’ Treadle and cancels the warning.

The project was surveyed, planned and deployed by the 10th March meaning that the AMEY CEFA’s workforce were able to work under the advanced protection methods offered by the ATWS within 2 weeks.